Skip to main content

About your Search

20121204
20121204
STATION
FBC 9
CNNW 7
SFGTV2 7
CNBC 6
MSNBCW 6
KQED (PBS) 5
CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 4
KQEH (PBS) 4
SFGTV 4
COM 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 84
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
. they are committed to science and social studies, arts, and other enrichment opportunities for all of our students. even in our mostpkñ?ñ? historically underserved schools, schools that previously wereÑññ?ñ? underachieving, the following examples illustrate in concrete terms the district -- to educating the entire child. framework has encouraged non-fiction reading especially in science and social studies. schools have purchased additional books with the funds available and material tolqñ?ñ? support student learning in all of the -- our school improvement grantrñ?ñ? leveraged resources have permitted us to make significant investments in technology and hardware that is being used across the curriculum. and in particular these investments further have>éñ?ñ? enhanced student interaction and engagement with science and social studies and even the arts curriculum. student funding has permitted the school to hire additional pe teachersióñ?ñ? while providing common planning relief time for classroom teachers to continue to col
frightening. >> tonight, frontline reports on the science and politics of the bitter "vaccine war." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.and by the corporatir public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and the hagler family. >> what a cute little face. aww, here we come. it's a girl! >> yeah! >> she's beautiful. >> what's her name? >> rachel. >> she's beautiful. she doesn't want to cry. >> narrator: a new life begins. >> congratulations. >> thank you. >> narrator: out of her mother's womb, rachel murphy is now surrounded by a new world filled with countless germs. modern medicine will do what i
not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of sys
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is cessy withut raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposing hig
long- range basic science and basic research areas, which support all of these innovations as a platform, if you will. government investment in basic science for example, in biotechnology and genomics, has created a whole new growth industry where the u.s. is the world leader. those are examples where the government and industry together both can do things which help build our economic future. > the book holds some fascinating insights. "producing prosperity" it is called. willy shee, one of the authors. thank you so much. > > thank you bill. still ahead, rebuilding the housing market by fixing the foreclosure crisis. an update is coming up next. when we decided to update ourselves on the foreclosure process in america, we didn't have to search very far. chicago ranks 3rd in the nation compared to other cities. by state, it's california, michigan, texas, and georgia leading the way with the most completed foreclosures this year. joining us on set this morning is mary jones. she is the executive director agora community services. good morning to you. > > good morning. thank
that >> i was going to say even though it is not darn -- not a 100% science -- [ talking over each other ] >> 100% science that has accuracy, a little less -- okay stop digging. [ talking over each other ] >> they didn't rate meteorologists i wonder who is dragging who down? [ laughing ] >> touche. >>> good morning. here's a look at a dry picture from sutro tower across san francisco towards the east bay hills. live doppler, scattered sprinkles northwest corner sonoma county where we are watching now, heavier rain lake and mendocino counties where going to stay for the better part of the morning commute. radar there the benefit of having live doppler 7 hd so far to the west already picking rain 90 miles offshore that going to take the better part of three hours to get to the coast. the sooner you get in northern sonoma the more likely you are going to be dry. upper 40s concord, live more, redwood city, los gatos, everybody else in the low to mid 50s. monterey bay, upper 40s to near 50. let's move on and talk about this forecast cycle, rain best in the north bay during the daylight hours
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
on the underlying technology. is this really cool technology, is it promoting the progress of science, is society better off because of that technology. it should not be based on the owner of that particular technology. >> reporter: regulators are holding a workshop next week to look at the behavior of these companies. the workshops are expected to shine a light on the controversial practice. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: another major international bank could soon pay up to settle allegations of price-fixing on a key interest rate. swiss bank u.b.s. is expected to settle charges of rigging "libor-rates" as soon as next week with regulators in the u.s. and britain. u.b.s. is not the first bank to settle charges for manipulating the rate that affects everything from credit cards, to state governments. last summer barclays paid almost half a billion dollars. >> tom: the major stock indices were weighed down as u.s. factories reported less business last month. after starting out the session with a small rally, the s&p 500 fell into the red by mid-day. it finished down 0.5%. trading vo
, the deadline from. while the specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which would be coincidentally on february 1st to explain where we are. >> i personally would have no objection to that. and just to be clear, is it -- the decision under option 4 need to be made by february or all of the preconditions that we've talked about need to be sewed up? i mean, i realize there can be a point in january where it all looks like it's lining up and you and the agency decide, we're going forward with option 4, subject to some contingencies. and if those go bad, it has the negative impacts you talked about. but i think the concern from the community that we're hearing, and i know you hear this, is that we sort o
known to science. nerve gas is an old-fashioned mustard gas -- nerve gas and old fashioned mustard gas. the bodies which litter the town were those of people who ran out of their houses to try to escape the gas and then were killed out in the open. since that moment, this woman has been alone in the world. she was only a teenager then. she lost 17 relatives, including her mother, two brothers, a sister. she keeps their pictures with her all the time. >> everyone wants to live, but what kind of life for us? every day is the day of the attack. we are wounded. there are scars on our bodies. the pain is still in our hearts deep down. >> no one has ever cleaned up the cellar where her family was gassed. even 25 years later, the stench of mustard gas is still strong, strong enough to kill small creatures. it makes our eyes weep and our heads ache. no doubt about it, things have come down here -- things that have come down here seem to die as a result. it could be a good idea not to spend too much time down here. all right. what i'm doing is just -- >> a top british expert in chemical warfare
. >> this is the largest gathering of scientists in the world. we cover all aspects of earth and space science. oceans, atmospheres, the solid earth. climate. >> reporter: four new observeries, using ground moisture sensors to gps satellites. >> they look up into the heart of the storms. a mile up in the atmosphere. >> one is being built this month to monitor pineapple express winder storms caused by atmospheric rivers. >> if we know the start time and the end time and we know how long it will last, that will likely predict 75% accuracy of the precipitation that is likely to occur. >> reporter: scientists tell us knowing how much rain is coming enables them to predict which areas will flood. reporting live in san francisco, david stevenson, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> los angeles mayor mayor antonio villaraigosa got involved in the labor dispute at the port of los angeles long beach. talks went nowhere over the weekend. mayor antonio villaraigosa wants around the clock bargaining with the help of a mediator. >>> the city counsel will discuss a plan to sell a parcel of land to a developer. the parcel is u
with no place of their own, spending nights on the sofa us of friends. lena is studying political science at the university of hamburg. she is not registered, so we cannot fill her at home. >> i live with a friend in a half from, which they are not allowed to sublet. that means i cannot have my name on e-mail or letter box. i can stay here for now, but no one official can no -- know. >> linda has a budget of 350 euros for living expenses, but even the cost of a room is higher than that -- lena has a budget of 350 euros. >> they invited everyone who was interested at the same time. there were 10 or 20 people looking at these flats, and we talked. so it is very difficult to get any kind of impression of the flat itself or get to know the people already living there. >> lena is not a rare case in hamburg. at the beginning of the semester, students services had to provide emergency beds in the sports hall, but students are still reporting long waiting times for housing, and private landlords are taking advantage of the free housing market. >> the landlords are looking for people with a perman
. these are actually very exciting and challenging times. the science that prevention works, that treatment is effective, and that people do in fact recover continues to grow. we've achieved parity and equity in law, or at least we've achieved the law-workin' on the implementation. now it's time to achieve a quality in service. since day one, this administration has been focused on applying sound, research-based drug policies geared toward protecting americans from the threats that drugs pose to public health and safety. i spent my entire career in law enforcement. i know we can't arrest our way out of our drug problem, and that's why our policies are based on the recognition that drug addiction is a disease, that it can be successfully prevented, and it can be treated. and simply put, the tragic wreckage wrought by drug use can be prevented before it becomes a criminal justice or a public health emergency. i stand here today as a living example that a better life is possible. i realize that in grace and wellness could lead me to improved mental health and physical health. as recently as 4
with the christian science upon ter's innocent question, will stephen colbert appear in the hobbit? followed by "the hollywood reporter" as stephen colbert to make cameo in the hobbit. and then the bombshell examiner headline, the hobbit movie news stephen colbert to star in lord of the rings prequel. i have to say-- i have to say that was an exciting and unverified escalation of my career. but is any of it true? well, my lips are sealed. but let me ask you this: if i did not appear in the hobbit trilogy, why do i have the elvish blade string. (cheers and applause) one of the original stings used in the lord of the ring the trilogy, where did i get t find it in a mountain troll cave or is it just some prop. oh no, this was made in gondolin before the fall. (cheers and applause) nation, i love new york city. the big apple, the city that never sleeps, rat xanadu. so i was crushed to learn the metropolis i know and love has changed, not one person was murdered in new york city on monday. nypd deputy commissioner paul brown couldn't even remember the last time a day went by where not one person was shot
political points because there is no science to back this up. experts have locked at this and this is the longest period since 1900 without a major hurricane hitting the united states whether it is floods or droughts they are showing no trends over sector 80 years and people are trying to draw short trends but the bottom line, congress is not only doing this at fema hearings but the senators like senator whitehouse from rhode island are doing this at defense authorization trying to ride hurricane sandy to the bank and the bank is setting the same for a carbon tax here in washington, dc. that is what they are trying, the treasury, is trying to do and there is fear that even republicans are going to do it as a revenue neutral part of tax reform. that is what this is about, more money from the government using hurricane sandy. >> what i worry about, if anything, be when we had a lot of physical storms back in the 60's, whether they would respond the same way and gotten the same initiatives that cost billions for what was a cycle. we do it again, but, i think before yo
year. what is it that makes the elderly so vulnerable? turns out it is in the science. fox news's john roberts has the details. >> good evening to you, gerri. we hear about the heart-breaking stories all the time. elderly people fall victim to scams whether unscrupulous home repair company or scam on internet or something in direct mail. we wonder why is it that they're so vulnerable? scientists from the university of california at los angeles, ucla, did a whole lot of research about this. it has less to do with cognitive decline as we get older but more to do how our emotions change. it is an area of the brain insular cortex, specifically the part of the brain that gives us the emotion disgust. ucla researchers took two groups, one age 2, the one average age 68. showed them pictures of people who were untrust worth any. here is what they found looked at functionnl mri associated with that. in the younger brains the areas of the brain that deals with disgust lit up like a stoplight that said stop, don't go further. in the older individuals the brains didn't register anything. untrustwo
. and so much help, this stuff is not easy, it is not science. but ken tried it make it fair, and doubly shore that those who needed the money g the money. ken is joining me now on the phone. ken, here is what worries me with money that governor cuomo is asking for, and governor christie of new jersey is figure for, they will likely get it, but there is no guaranteethat folks who need it will get it. >> you have to make sure that money doled out goes to the right people in a tamely fashion -- timely fashion the way that programs work, as you know, from covering 9/11 and bp. fast, without restricttion and used to ground the way it is supposed to be used. if there are administrative prove lem, then they have to be more efffficient. it is that simple. neil: but it seems to be for others who tried to do, what you dwell, that well is a long lag. for those affected, without a house, a few weeks is a long lag, in the scheme of things it ma not be. but in this case, it seems that fema was a dollar late and a day short, then some. my only fear, is that giving such entities more power and money ma
, in the chemical laboratory, in the health science room, they broke a vial that had some of it in it. they evacuated that school. the fire department came in with all kinds of equipment to make sure they were not exposed to it. women who are pregnant, they say don't eat fish that has mercury in it and they cautioned them, the that there is surgeonfish you can eat. there are all kinds of reasons not to be exposed to mercury. yet we continue to put it in vaccinations as a preservative. in 1929, they came up with for marisol. they tested it on 29 people who had meningitis. they all died of meningitis, but the the mercury in the vaccination was not a contributing factor. so since 1929, it has never been completely tested and they continue to use it in vaccinations. it was not so bad when wenchow got a vaccination or two or three. but now they -- when one child got a vaccination or two or three. but now they get 29. the brain tissues to not -- it stays in there and it causes severe problems. during my chairmanship, for six years, we had four years of hearings. we had people from all of th
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. six minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. charlie pierce from esquire.com coming up at the bottom of the hour. sexyliberal.com the sexy liberal website, sexy liberal on facebook, get tickets. d.c. sexy liberal show january 19th. there are only five vip tickets left now. >> as of 15 minutes ago there were two left. >> stephanie: oh dear. i think three quarters of the orchestra already gone, so hurry. we have been talking about the fiscal cliff, it is like we can just dial back to last summer and yet what has hand since this then [♪ "jeopardy" theme music ♪] >>
be donated to science to study the long-term effects of concussions. that was before investigators say he shot himself in the chest. and the scientists who examined deurson's brain as well as junior. researches at boston university report they investigated brain samples from 85 people all of whom had histories of brain injuries. they claim 80% of those brains showed signs of a certain type of brain disease that cause memory loss, depression and dementia. almost all of those brains they say belong to athletes. but scientist its say they don't have enough evidence to prove that the hits on the field caused the brain disease. earlier today on "studio b," a doctor suggested we have reached a point where parents really should think twice before even allowing their kids to play football. >> parents that are watching today need to be highly suspicious and highly cautious about having their kids participate in high school football, either if they don't get the right test done, if they are not followed frequently and certainly to make sure that the right protection is put in place to at least abso
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ >> greg: last week, i went on a tour to promote my book "the joy of hate" which took me from florida, to alabama, and georgia. to tennessee. some call this the south with sarcasm. a buddy of mine gave me flick "deliverance" to watch as a joke. but i freaked out, large crowds with mom for daughters and sons for dads. dads for daughters. so many brought food from pumpkin bread to moonshine. that nearly killed me. more unicorns to shake a horn at. each place i went fan of the five turned on by a parent or their child. this was shared activity, the "the five," "red eye requests ants fnc, key place for families to commiserate. most is over their hatred of jasper. that makes them intelligent. but something is going on here. you fair food and everything. a stranger offered to take our orders and never heard or seen from again. new yorkers will mock this. the stupid rubs. but this is the only culture we have left as we barrel down identity politics and victim measure victor. only place left that everyone is the same is here. as
will tell you what i learned. back in february of this year, ken salazar called this plan a, quote, science-based approach that restores the health of our lands and wildlife and supports jobs and revenue for local communities. although there has been some press saying this is going to dough stroy jobs for people -- destroy jobs for people, that might thought necessarily be entirely accurate. they will allow logging. they are not going to be getting rid of people. >> i had an opinion before you brought this to my attention because you did some reading. i will choose to ignore what you said because it will hurt what i had to say. bill isn't one human job more available than one owl life? >> i don't know about that. according to what remi said we will be creating jobs here too. >> she is lying jie. you -- >> you are lying. >> i am quoting ken salazar. >> she a american with the name salazar. >> he isn't even from here. >> he is part of big owl, by the way. he is paid by the owls. you know what the problem with owls is, they are perceived to be smart. they haven't invented a single thing. they
't heard california college of arts and sciences, but i'm sure there are many, many more that would probably have some things they could bring to the table and draft something that worked in a cooperative manner. so, i'm probably in favor of a continuance. it might not have to be a long one. maybe mattious might be able to give us an idea how long you think it might take if we had a continuance to get together with these groups. if you wanted to give me some input on that, i'd be happy to have some guidance as to how long a period of time you feel you'd be able to work out the various outreach that we're talking about. * >> being unaware of your schedule, and i know that the board of supervisors will go into recess in two weeks. but i believe that to be on the safe side, something around mid january would probably be the safest so that there will be time both before and after the holidays to conduct those conversations. [speaker not understood]. >> great, thank you. okay, those were my main feelings. >> commissioner borden. >> yeah, i do have a question for staff. so, i do think tha
of science and that will run for a number of months. so we would like to thank the california academy for putting on display the mammoth tooth. and we will be looking for a new home in 2013. and finally on october 17th we had number one of our regularly schedule committee meetings to provide a construction update to our neighbors. so everything that moving along well. now to give our construction update with steve turner. >> good morning, directors. steve, ru, with turner construction, construction oversight. i don't know. is that up? there it is. >> another good month, of work or almost a month and a half since we filled you in on the last period. there were no recordable incidents. we did have one near miss. but, brought to light some issues with the excavation process of sight lines and so that has been dealt with successfully. and allowing the excavator to work while the folks down below were able to position themselves appropriately so they are not in the way of it. we have 550,000 craft hours now, about 60,000 since the last update. 157, chefs, and i will show you the chart for
of this. that's nine and a half less school days for us to teach reading, math, science, you name it. but yet we expect our students to graduate on time and to be just as successful as other students with"ej3w nine less instructional days. as a teacher i just want everyone to understand the pressure that you have in fulfilling your lesson plans when you have nine less days to teach the students the same amount of information that you're expected to. five years ago we were ranked 38 out of 50 in( jó the country anr people spending. today ?j x8ñ are ranked 47th. all of the southern states in the u.s. that make far less than we do in our tax dollar base spend more than we do on per people spending. in response to this in 2004 san francisco voters passed a measure to counter this. parents knew that although we were once first in the country in our public school system, not just k-12 but also higher education that we were neveris% going back there. so parents put on the ballot a measure called proposition h so we could ask the city to spend a morgs of our tax dollars to enrich our publi
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. [ male announcer ] zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a space captain, zeebox would be an alien, first officer. just like an officer helps a captain explore the universe, zeebox helps you discover what shows are most popular, where the biggest buzz is, or what the stars are watching now. download zeebox free, >>> never underestimate the importance of the banks. eventually that situation will be resolved. once the cliff is behind us we could give out what would make this go higher. we are never g
innovators among charities increase education for girls and minority students in science and technology. seven nonprofit will win the first global global impact awards today. among them $5 million to water, a group that drill wells for water across africa. and $5 million to donors choose a doctor or for new investors is a science and math classes with the college board for under represent students. google says innovations is underfunded among nonprofits. >> we will be back in a minute welcome back the time is 4 :15. the bay area continue to conducclean up the aftermathf a storm that knocked down trees and cut the power for thousands. the trees all over were not down on to cars and homes and power was cut to thousands. the rain is being partly blamed for causing giant sinkhole here in lafayette. workers spent most of the day cleaning up the hole with holes, as the raiders and dump trucks. city officials say an expose a foot storm pipe was designed to save for transport water underneath the road but somehow failed. the road keeton sunday morning creating a crack crater that is 80 ft. long
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. dagen: another day, another meeting. it still looks awfully wide in dealing with the looming tax increases and spending cuts. are they closer to a deal than we think? here to answer brett baier. he joins us from washington, d.c. was the white house or the democrats surprised by the republican proposal? >> dagen, i do not think that they were surprised. they knew another proposal would be coming back. they probably guessed that it would not include tax rate increases. that is the dance that is going on here. two scorpions dancing around each other waiting to strike. you know bowles said last night at an interview, i think you said it best, both sides would get killed by their base if the true deal was out right now. they would just get killed. dagen: do they know what the true deal is? >> no. i do not think they know yet. i think they know the framework of the true deal. they almost got there. they know what each side needs to happen for their faith to be semi- happy. they know where the red line is that at least they ha
, a level of the threat and the possible responses by the medical science community, fox news senior medical contributor has written extensively about and mx and this has the prospects of becoming one. first off, good to have you with us. >> good to see you. lou: cre stands for something that i could not possibly pronounced. >> it sounds very foreboding and mysterious and deadly, which is. lou: and it is so deadly and it is spreading. the original report, when we first saw the report. and i want to give them credit for that. the idea that this drug is absolutely drug proved to all non antibiotics, is that truly the case? >> not entirely. each time you see this there is occasionally an antibiotic that actually can be used against it, but often this 25, 26 antibiotics tested against this but don't work. and actually it is good to talk about this because it is a symptom of what is wrong with the current situation in medicine are we see people sicken and i see you. we throw a very powerful antibiotic got them, something like merope n.m., which is what fun talking about. lou: the last line of def
, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. >> eliot: i'm back with dan gross of "newsweek" and the daily beast. brian beutler and eric bates. i want to start out with the financial trend financial packs that i mentioned earlier in the show. dan, would that be a bad idea? a good idea? something that we should think about and hold in reserve for another day. >> i actually think it's a good idea. the economists say if you want something less of something tax it more. if we want less speculation and less out of control training by these crazy machines that are doing hundreds of thousands of trades a day to capture a fraction of a penny in economic gains, taxes it would discourage those and raise a fair amount of money in a fairly painless way in trading. >> eliot: would this be an useful compromise point? you want the capital markets to be liquid. you want to allocate capital efficiently among businesses and he cansectors. all of that used to happen before the hedge fund that were driven by computers. you could butt a transaction tax it on
system for measuring atmosphere ever rivers as they hit california. the injured to help science and forecast these storms like we just saw the last couple of days. >> and the benefit for ought home especially if you live near a river betting flood forecasts and also snow versus rain forecast to be able to pinpoint that snow level all of that beginning today right here in california. full forecast in a few minutes. >> good stuff, paul. thank you. >>> and you can track the rain anytime with our live hi-def doppler radar. it's on our website, cbssf.com/weather. >>> well, it's one of the biggest freshman classes of state lawmakers since the 1930s. today 39 new members of the state assembly took the oath of office. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee in sacramento tonight with that. grace. >> reporter: well, allen, the senate class is also sworn in today. they had 9 new members but most of them have had experience in the assembly and that's really unlike this new assembly class that we are seeing a lot of inexperienced freshmen as you mentioned. despite that and maybe because of that
. >> what this mission is about is integrated science. in the going to be one single moment where we all stand up and on the basis of a single measurement have a hallelujah moment. >>reporter: 2.5 billion dollar curiosity landed on mars in august on two year search for signs that life once existed on the planet. >> same conference in san francisco nasa talk about the voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977. it turns out all these years later it's still brimminging back new information. nasa announced voymer 1 now at the far reach of the solar system. this is nasa animation of voyager. area is called the magnetic highway and boundary that separates the solar system from the rest of space. now this means voyager one is on track to become the first man made object to exit solar system. when it will come is unknown partly because just no precedent. item fascinating. what an accomplishment. >> new to the thrown. up next britain royal family reveals some very big baby news. >> president obama takes to 20th tore push the solution to the fiscal cliff. g.o.p. makes a counter offer and now g
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> live from america's news headquarters, i'm ainsley earhardt. the national weather service expecting another storm to hit parts of northern california on tuesday. three powerful storms drenching that region last week with 15 to 20 inches of rain. thousands had their power knocked out. the latest storm's supposed to continue into wednesday. forecasters don't expect it to be as bad as the earlier storms. as much as 5 inches of rain could fall before the bad weather moves out. one of the nation's largest teachers unions, proposing a tough exam that teachers valid to pass before entering their profession. the new report says that the exam would produce more qualified educators. the aft saying they don't want teachers to just be handed a classroom. it is being compared to the bar exam, which lawyers take. i'm ainsley earhardt. now back to "on the record" with greta. thanks for watching fox. greta. >> greta: political football. broadcaster bob costas using last night's halftime show to lecture sports fans abo
return, a sharp increase in the number of scanners filing fraudulent returns. science and technology editor is with us now. it looks like they have stolen tens of thousands of people's refunds. >>guest: potentially billions. part of the problem, is identifying that there is a problem. the i.r.s. says they do not know the extent of the problem and it is hard if them to track and identify that something like this is happening. >>shepard: explain what going on. >>guest: it has me disgusted. identity scammers buying something in a store is one thing but they filing fraudulent tax runs, that is something else. >>shepard: they would file my tax returns using their address and if i had a refund it would come back to them? >>guest: exactly. the challenge comes in because if you are like me you find out you getting a refund and you file as soon as you can and you can file in january. businesses and financial institutions do thought have to file their information with the government until the end of march. often the i.r.s. doesn't have the information it needs to verify or crosscheck what has
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> speaker boehner was at the white house for a christmas party. the two of you didn't speak. what is it going to take to get the two of you in a room to hash this out? >> speaker bane been a and i speak frequently. i don't -- speaker boehner and i speak frequently. the issue doesn't have to sit in a room. the issue that is relevant is the acknowledgment if we are going to raise revenues, that is sufficient to balance with the cuff cuts that we have made and further reform and entitlement i am prepared to make, that we are going to have to see the rates on the top 2%. go up. and we are not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> getting in to that room and hammering out the deal doesn't seem like it's happening anytime soon. there may be talking behind the scenes. as far as the big players it doesn't mean to be a lot of movement on the fiscal cliff. here is what the senate minority leader had to say. >> i hope at some point here the pres
... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rket science. it's just t common sense. from td ameritre. liz: here we go, two minutes before the closing bell, let's go tony -- tomy -- nicole. stocks seeing a bit of a bump ahead of results with a ton of shorts biting their nails over this one. >> it's an interesting one. pandora's a winner, and the question is whether or not they increase the revenue. people are betting yes. david: i'm david asman, there's nicole. netflix, seeing a big pop today. they signed a deal with disney. apparently, investors think it's profitable. >> it is a big deal here because what you can do is they will exclusively distribute disney movies through television in 20 # 16 when the current deal expires with stars channel. it's a big deal. liz: what happened with gap, and there were comments from analysts, we know that, but this is a stock that's done just beautifully over the past year or so, and, today, it took that. >> we saw over a hundred companies rushing to pay dividends, but the gap is passing on the payout to the shareholder, and they a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)